Monthly Archives: October 2009

Twitterfeed Rocks

twitterfeed_faviconThere are a slew of Twitter applications out there, but I must proclaim that Twitterfeed is my favorite one so far. I’ve been using it for some marketing engagements recently and have found it to be a very useful tool – one of the few Twitter applications I’ve found with the right mix of simplicity and richness in its feature set.

Twitterfeed is primarily intended for bloggers who want to automate tweets with links to their new blog posts, but I’ve been using it to post relevant links from feeds across the web to interested twitterlings.  As a huge advocate of content marketing, using a tool that can automatically share useful content with prospects is extremely powerful.

From their usability perspective, Twitterfeed has done one of the most important things a successful Twitter application-maker needs to do; they’ve made it incredibly simple to use.  From allowing you to get started by signing into the app with OpenID, which allows you to sign in with your account credentials sites like Yahoo! and Google, to the automatic connection with your Twitter account when setting up your RSS feeds makes Twitterfeed very easy to use.

If you haven’t checked it out, I highly recommend giving it a whirl.  TwitterFeed Rocks!

Why Customers Buy

Unsuccessful startups often think customers will come if they build them a solution they should want.  This is backwards.

Startup success can often be boiled down to one thing.  Successful startups know why their customers will buy their product and develop their offering and marketing plans armed with this knowledge.

Once you know why people buy, you are able to accomplish three things.

1. You can build your product to meet your customers true needs
By developing the right product and proper pricing that accounts for the total cost of ownership of your product, your business can be profitable sooner.

2. You can describe and sell your product in a way that resonates with your prospects
It’s a beautiful thing when the positioning of your product matches what your prospects want to hear.

3. You can identify the best channels to sell your products
If you know why customers buy,  you should know enough about them to create a customer mind map and know what the day in their life holds to better target marketing channels in which they will buy your product.

These three things set startups up for success.  The customer is always right, so companies need to be vigilant about getting their team out there to listen to them.  Get out there, get to know your customers and understand why they buy.

Social Media Step One – Go Where Your Customers Are

As more companies are embracing social media, instead of hearing “Should we participate in social media,” I’ve been hearing “How do we get started in social media.”

In regards to which platforms to participate on, I advise companies to be on the same platforms as their target audience.

For B2B companies, this usually means you’ll want to use LinkedIn and  Twitter.  Here you should be able to find and monitor your target audience.  If they are on these networks, you can use them as new channels for communicating with them.  For consumer-oriented companies, options to build your social media presence are expanded.  In particular, Facebook can be a good place to set up a page for your company or product.

Different networks reach different audiences and require different etiquette and dedications of time, so plan accordingly.  If your prospects and customers are using social media, you should too.

The first step of getting started is finding out where your audience hangs out.  Once you identify these networks, you can craft a social media plan of attack with maximum impact – one that reaches and interacts with and delivers value to your customers.  First things first, go where your customers are.

Where are your customers using social media?  Leave a comment with your experience.