Tag Archives: twitter

Five Nuggets from the Internet Summit

The Internet Summit was last week in Raleigh, NC and I want to share with you five nuggets I took away from the panel sessions I attended.

1) Blogging is Not Dead
Didn’t really think blogging was dead, but I guess with a few bloggers ditching blogging for micro-blogging some were wondering where the blog fits in.  The take-away is that blogs should be a hub for your online marketing initiatives.  For B2B folks, they’re great for thought-leadership positioning too.

2) Search Marketers Start with Google
Google AdWords is easy to use and on the platform where more than 60% of search traffic resides.  Unless you know your audience is on Yahoo/Bing, or your budget is significantly lacking, Google is where you want to start. One other theme around search marketing is that it can also be used effectively for branding purposes.

3) Analytics are Increasingly Important
Think measurement first. Tie your business goals with analytics (read: reverse engineer the goal to the measurement).  Include KPIs as part of budget discussion.

4) Email Marketers use Best Practices
Be relevant (know your audience)
Think holistically (where does email fit into your overall marketing campaign)
Segment and personalize emails (this ties back into relevance)

5) Twitter is Versatile
Great for monitoring brand (customer service) and as a content distribution medium. Expectations are that niche providers like Yammer and the like will start gaining popularity in 2010.

What do you think?  Did the Internet Summit 09 get it right?

Social Media Tool from StumbleUpon is Su.pr

Tim Ferris of 4-Hour-Work-Week fame has been collaborating with StumbleUpon (a favorite time suck pastime of mine) to create a new social media management tool, Su.pr.

StumbleUpon Toolbar
Image via Wikipedia

From the looks of it, we are in for a real treat.  Su.pr promises to save you lots of time in your social media management routine and help improve your traffic too!

Tim Ferriss points out how in this StumbleUpon juiced blog post.  Here’s why he thinks Su.pr could become the hub of your social media empire.

Prior to SU.PR (pronounced “super”), I had to use ping.fm for updating Twitter/Facebook/LinkedIn at the same time, bit.ly for basic analytics like click-through, scattered tools for viewing retweets, and nothing allowed me to schedule tweets well.

It was all a serious pain in the ass.

Enter Su.pr, which allows him to:

– Get suggestions for optimal posting times: get more traffic per post
– Schedule as many tweets or posts as I want, for any time
– See my click-throughs in real-time
– Post to Twitter and Facebook at the same time, with more platforms in the pipeline
– Use my own short URL (i.e. http://www.fourhourblog.com/ab123) instead of someone else’s branding

This is all really great stuff that will save a ton of time for social media content developers and publishers.  It remains to be seen whether the traffic for content improves, but the analytics that are included in Su.pr are what really get me geeked about trying it out.

The built-in analytics make this tool especially sweet for marketers not already using bit.ly.  Deploying measurable social media content should help improve your case for including more social media investments in your organization.

Now it’s just a matter of when this service will be available to everyone.  In the meantime, follow the StumbleUpon Twitter profile and keep your eye out for a claim code tweet for your own Su.pr account.
UPDATE:
After trying it out, Su.pr while potentially great for the reasons listed above, has framing issues that some might remember from the Digg toolbar.  This framing issue wreaks havoc on getting accurate analytics and can be a real pain to use when comparing traffic from non-Su.pr visits.  Another issue I’ve had is with the scheduled Twitter posting being significantly delayed. 

What do you think?  Is Su.pr going to change the way you manage your social media content?

Web 2.0 is Friendlier than Web 1.0

I enjoy Web 2.0 sites like Facebook and Twitter because they foster accountability and positive interactions.

Sometime ago, people with cryptic usernames like webspider hid behind anonymity when interacting online.  In the Web 2.0 world, people are claiming their identities (which is a great for other reasons given this trend) and using social media sites in a way that more closely mimics real life interactions.

Fraudulent activity in the Web 1.0 world of shadows has given way to a more trustworthy world in Web 2.0.  This trustworthiness is a double-edged sword, but at the end of the day I find the authentic nature of Web 2.0 to be a much friendlier place to visit. The accountability of real identities ensures friendliness is the norm and mitigates the unsavory activity that Web 1.0 anonymity bred.

SmilePositive interactions are commonplace in Web 2.0.  Visits to Facebook and Twitter are full of affirmation and empathetic sentiments.  Following my friend feed of birthday wishes and affirmative comments help keep me up with all the great things going on in my friends’ lives and puts a smile on my face.  Hooray for Web 2.0!